VR / Monitor Modes

Ovation can be used with a virtual reality headset or a computer monitor. In order to use these modes, the user must have the proper VR or Monitor license.

Launching Ovation in VR or Monitor Mode

The Ovation Launcher lets the user decide which mode Ovation will launch in. If VR is selected but a headset is not detected, the application will launch in Monitor Mode.

Ovation Launcher

Main Differences Between VR and Monitor Mode

Immersion

In VR Mode, the user feels as if they are physically in the venue with audience members looking back at them. They can look down and see their virtual hands. They can walk around. They can hear sounds and directionally identify the person or object that made them.

In Monitor Mode, the user is instead looking at a computer monitor. The venue, the audience, the audio, etc. are all the same, they are just experiencing it through a smaller "window" into the virtual world in front of them.

Interaction

Looking around

In VR Mode, the headset on the user's head controls where they are looking in the virtual world. In Monitor Mode, the user controls where they are looking by moving their mouse.

Moving around

In VR Mode, the user can walk around in the real world (within the range limit of the headset cord) and they will walk the same distance in the virtual world. In Monitor Mode, the user presses buttons on their keyboard to walk.

Using Objects

In VR Mode, the user is holding tracked Motion Controllers and interacts with the virtual world using them. They can reach out in 3D space in front of them and grab a marker to draw on a whiteboard, hold a mic up to their mouth, or make gestures while speaking. In Monitor Mode, Ovation simplifies most actions to work with a mouse. For example, users can draw on a whiteboard by moving their mouse cursor around on the board.

Training

Ovation has three main training categories: Gaze, Voice, and Hands.

Gaze

This category refers to where the speaker was looking while delivering a speech. In VR Mode, this is determined by where the user's headset (and thus their head) is pointed. A VR headset with eye tracking can even determine the exact location in the virtual world that the user is looking at. In Monitor Mode, it is impossible to determine where the user is looking and, as a result, Gaze training is not available.

Voice

This category refers to all spoken audio while delivering a speech. With one exception, there is no difference between VR and Monitor Mode. Both can determine what was spoken and train the user based on that. The exception is Mic Distance training, which requires VR motion controllers.

Hands

This category refers to how the speaker moved their hands while delivering a speech. In VR Mode, this is determined by the tracked motion controllers in the user's hands. In Monitor Mode, it is impossible to determine what the user's hands are doing and, as a result, Hands training is not available.